QCOSS Board Member Profile - Nadia Currie

Nadia is the Operations Manager at Queensland Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Protection Peak (QATSICPP) based in West End and the newest member of the QCOSS Board.

QATSICPP seeks to ensure the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are represented and provides support to the Aboriginal Community Controlled Child Protection Sector by providing support in training and best practice opportunities.

We asked Nadia about her role.

“My role within QATSICPP is to provide executive support to the CEO and make certain QATSICPP staff are supported in their roles. This includes arranging travel, supervision and core duties. I assist with policy and advocacy within the organisation and provide input to all aspects of the organisation along with the support of my CEO, Natalie Lewis and the [strong] team at QATSICPP.”

QATSICPP's vision is to work towards all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people being physically, emotionally and spiritually strong, living in a safe, caring and nurturing environment within their families and communities, and afforded the same life opportunities available to other children and young people to achieve their full potential.

Nadia is driven “To ensure the voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and young people are represented. If their voices are not able to be heard, then we as community members should be accountable in making sure we are the mouth pieces for them, especially in the positions that we hold.”

What one change does Nadia believe would make the lives of her clients better?

“Better consultation – substantial consultation that does not resemble the majority of current consultations, where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples are add-ons or are part of a process where the outcome is already known and their input is just for procedure only.” 

Nadia has a powerful vision for Queensland’s future and particularly for vulnerable people.

“My vision for Queensland’s future is to move away from the current deficit narrative and move into a strength-based narrative. This alone allows people to understand and realise their strengths and what they are capable of, especially if there are robust support tools wrapped around them.”

Nadia tells us that the best part of her job is “Being able to make changes that benefit the sector. More importantly being able to learn from the community and my team at QATSICPP.”