Every Queenslander should be able to have their glass half full!

Media release - 11 April 2018

Every person should be able to have a shower, wash their clothes or flush the toilet without worrying about how to pay their water bill.

The final recommendation made by the Queensland Competition Authority, if accepted by government, will see the increase in bulk water prices trickle down to household bills.

Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) CEO Mark Henley said that Queenslanders are already drowning in cost-of-living expenses in a period of low wage growth.

“This is really an opportunity for the government to extend the current water concession to all health care card holders who pay for water - home owners and tenants alike.

“Currently, only pensioner owner-occupants are eligible for the Queensland Government’s $120 annual water rebate,” QCOSS CEO Mark Henley said. “And this is simply not good enough.”

“In this instance home owners and renters need to be treated in the same way.  All renters are currently ineligible for the water concessions which can leave them high and dry.”

Residents in Redland, Noosa and Sunshine Coast council areas can expect the highest increases as their prices are brought into line with other areas in South East Queensland.

“Regardless of concessions, with water prices set to increase annually over the next three years, it is essential that people look at identifying and fixing any concealed leaks as they will really cost households.”

“Tenants who pay for all water have no control over the repair of a concealed leak. If you think you might have a concealed leak you should contact your property manager or your local water provider.”

For nearly 60 years QCOSS has been a leading force for social change to eliminate poverty and disadvantage. With members throughout Queensland, QCOSS supports a strong community service sector.

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To arrange an interview please contact Karen Murphy on 0423 245 252

Queensland Council of Social Service (QCOSS) CEO Mark Henley said that Queenslanders are already drowning in cost-of-living expenses in a period of low wage growth.